Shingles Vaccine Troubling Ingredients

Many people Zostovaxwho at least look at a thing and smell it before they eat it think nothing of having a mysterious liquid injected directly into their blood. Many who read food labels for every last ingredient have no idea what they are taking in a vaccine injection. The shingles vaccine, like every other, contains troubling ingredients that should give thinking people pause for reflection.

Some Common Vaccine Ingredients
Procon.org lists vaccine ingredients (found in the final vaccine product), process ingredients (things used to create the vaccine that may or may not appear in the final product), and growth mediums (substances in which vaccines are grown) for vaccines approved by the FDA and recommended by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC.) Controversial products used to make vaccines include African Green Monkey (Vero) cells, aluminum, cow products, Cocker Spaniel cells, formaldehyde, human fetal lung tissue cells, insect products, mouse brains.

Zostovax Shingles Vaccine Ingredients
Merck’s Zostavax shingles vaccine includes monosodium L-glutamate (MSG), aborted fetal cells (MRC-5*), bovine calf serum (blood taken from “domestic” cattle), Neomycin (an antibiotic used to prevent or treat bacterial infections),

Aborted Fetal Cells?
Can human beings who consider themselves “pro-life” take a guilt-free shingles vaccination? Would even those who are immune to moral arguments order anything on any menu anywhere if that ingredient were listed? It’s one thing to eat the veal calf meat of a tortured animal, but imbibing in human fetal tissue would seem beyond the pale for the morally upright.

*According to procon.org, MRC-5 (Medical Research Council 5) is a common vaccine ingredient “composed of human diploid cells (cells containing two sets of chromosomes) derived from the normal lung tissues of a 14-week-old male fetus aborted for ‘psychiatric reasons’ in 1966 in the United Kingdom, Eagle’s Basal Medium in Earle’s balanced salt solution with bovine serum.”  Even those who might prefer to bend sinister from their lofty moral high ground by accepting the vaccine maker’s dubious implication that it’s ok to abort for ‘psychiatric reasons,’ even those folks may want to consider that being injected with a mentally damaged person’s DNA material may not be the “smartest” move they’ve ever made.

Possible side effects of ZOSTAVAX?
Merck reports no moral repugnance, or even ambivalence, over its shingles Zostavax vaccine. Merck does, however, list “the most common side effects that people in the clinical studies reported after receiving the vaccine.” They include:

•  redness, pain, itching, swelling, hard lump, warmth, or bruising at the shot site
•  headache
•  allergic reactions, which may be serious and may include difficulty in breathing or swallowing. If you have an allergic reaction, call your doctor right away.
•  chickenpox
•  fever
•  hives at the injection site
•  joint pain
•  muscle pain
•  nausea
•  rash
•  rash at the injection site
•  shingles (warned since 2015)
•  swollen glands near the injection site (that may last a few days to a few weeks)

Merck also warns that you should not get ZOSTAVAX if you:

•  are allergic to any of its ingredients.
•  are allergic to gelatin or neomycin.
•  have a weakened immune system (immune deficiency, leukemia, lymphoma, HIV/AIDS).
•  take high doses of steroids by injection or by mouth.
•  are pregnant or plan to get pregnant

Shingles Vaccine Missing Warnings

Merck does not warn – as the company is not required to do so by the FDA – that the “effectiveness” of a vaccine is established not by how well the shot may work for the majority of its recipients. Effectiveness in a vaccine is determined solely by its being able to elicit an antibody response. If antibodies are produced following a vaccine, then that vaccine is determined to be “effective.” The presence of those antibodies, however, has no known causal relationship with whether or not that vaccination will offer protection against infection. If that language were in the “Warnings,” one wonders how many people would take this vaccine, or any other for that matter, without our daily avalanche of vaccine propaganda. It is certainly fair to ask how well this shingles vaccine works. It is fair to ask whether this vaccine is worth the risk of taking it.

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